UNICEF Kid Power…Promoting Activity and Charity

The UNICEF Kid Power Band is a partnership between UNICEF, Star Wars, and Target, and offers kids the chance to “unlock” food for malnourished children through activity. The idea combines the need for physical activity engagement among children in developed countries and the need for food for children in developing countries. One might hope that funds to feed malnourished children would be provided regardless of corresponding activity levels if the funds are available, but this concept does provide motivation to individuals with the band…and teaches children about giving to others. For more information, see the UNICEF Kid Power site. There is also a 44 second video to promote the program and to encourage kids to get active!

 

More Fit = Better Brains!

New research published this week demonstrates that children who are more fit have better math performance that lower fit peers.  The study by Chaddock-Heyman et. al. adds to the growing body of evidence that fitness and academic achievement are linked, and can be used as support for the inclusion of classroom physical activity.

See the Research tab for the more information!

New Research!

Norris et al. (2015) recently conducted a systematic review of classroom physical activity.  Findings indicate that classroom physical activity increases student physical activity levels and significantly improves or does not hinder educational outcomes with all results either positive or neutral.  This review calls for further research to gain a more complete understanding of the impact of classroom physical activity impact.

Naylor et al. (2015) systematically reviewed implementation of school-based physical activity interventions.  While studies varied in their assessment of implementation strategies and outcomes, the most influential factor to implementation success was time.

Burrows et al. (2014) determined that scheduled physical activity is associated with better academic performance.  In this sample, about 80% of students exercised for less than two hours per week.  Students who reported more than four hours per week of exercise were significantly more likely to perform about the 50th percentile in standardized academic achievement tests.

Katz, Mulder, and Pronk (2014) used worksite wellness Sit-Stand results as a method of improving student behavior and learning.

Chaput, Carson, Gray, and Tremblay (2014) proposed the importance of all movement behaviors in a 24 hour period for overall health of children.

See our Research Page for full abstracts.